Archives

Forgiving Pipeline

  Hawaiian photographer Amber Mozo lost her father, Jon Mozo, to Oahu’s infamous Banzai Pipeline in 2005. Thirteen years later, she faces the wave that took his life. From RedBull.com: Amber Mozo is a 22-year-old photographer born and raised on the North Shore of Oahu. As the daughter of legendary surf photographer Jon Mozo, a former fixture in the lineups along the famed North Shore, Amber was raised with a love for both the ocean and photography. Jon risked life and limb daily in pursuit of photographic magic — images of electric blue waves exploding with herculean force onto shallow reefs, intrepid surfers standing strong at this nexus of natural chaos. As any dedicated water photographer can attest, chasing images that put viewers right in the belly of the beast of the North Shore’s most dangerous waves means putting yourself in some of the most risky positions imaginable, submitting to the power of the ocean. On February 9, 2005, Jon suffered a head injury while photographing Backdoor — an injury that would claim his life. He was …

Midnight Ramblers

  “Meet the groupies of the golden age. Midnight Ramblers reimagines the dreamy lives of the muses, style icons and artists that inspired the rock stars of days gone by. Follow the NYC groupies rambling through the streets in a glittery haze of platforms, feather boas, bellbottoms and band tees, chasing the music that sets them free. We’re here to uncover the true meaning of “groupie” and redeem the notorious G-word.” “Groupies have played a pivotal role shaping the industry, as fashion icons, musical muses and love interests. Pamela Des Barres founded the groupie band, the GTOs, which was produced by Frank Zappa. The Rolling Stones wrote “Ruby Tuesday” about a groupie Keith Richards once knew, and David Bowie hired Cherry Vanilla, self-proclaimed groupie, as his super publicist. They’ve inspired dozens of songs and broke, even more, hearts, and Midnight Rambler is re-imagining the stories of the groupies behind the feather boas and swathes of suede.” – Dazed    

i-D’s Summer of Love (4-Part)

  In 2017, i-D put together a 4-part series entitled Summer of Love. Each chapter focuses on a new love story, and particularly how it interacts with the city it’s set in. From Paris, to London to Barcelona, through whispered interviews and vivid, intimate footage, i-D opens the door to exploring modern love in the most candid, visually beautiful way possible. For the first episode, i-D follows three friends who met in London’s gay club scene, exploring how queer clubbing formed and deepened their relationships. Safe places where people go to be who they are are integral aspects of a city’s nightlife, and these friends show us how love is flourishing in the London LGBTQ+ community. For the second episode, i-D heads to Paris, following a first love story between young model & actor Lukas Ionesco, and model Angele Metzger.  Lukas and Angele roam the Parisian streets, sharing their perspectives on modern romance, exploring gender and femininity and demonstrating how punk and love go hand in hand. From i-D: “Tia and Nadine are in love. From a shared …

Can’t Nobody Else Love You

  Can’t Nobody Else Love You is a short film presented by Dazed Digital. Directed by Ivan Olita, the film is an exploration of our perceptions of New York City, and the truths of the lives of six artists living there. Olita explores the difficulties faced by the young artists, and the concept that though they feel they are surrounded by like-minded people – the reason they came to New York – depression, access to drugs, and social media find them more lonely than ever, and not excelling like they thought they would. In an interview with Dazed, Olita said: “It was no longer about romanticizing a way of life; it became more about reporting the reality of their lives and trying to do it in the most romantic way. So when I think about the piece, I think about something real – raw – as its protagonists would say. It’s not comforting to watch, and it should not feel that way. New York is obviously the (un)spoken protagonist of the piece. It is where these kids find …

my story. claire michelle.

  Listening to Claire talk is pure magic for the soul. Through these several hour-long videos, we watch and listen as Claire first visits Hawaii, and her documentation from thereon of her reawakening of self and transformation. I know a lot of people who absolutely hate Claire, and a lot of people who adore her. Regardless, I find her to be constantly inspiring, and cemementing my faith in literal humanity. I suggest you save them for the rainiest days, when you need the most hope and encouragement. In my mind, this is the first instalment of a shift in Claire’s videos. Hawaii was filmed and uploaded by her about a year ago, right around the time I came across her, and it documents her first trip to Hawaii, and reawakening of self. To be Free encapsulates Claire’s last weeks in LA, the creation of a new piece of work, and the further events leading her to escape LA and return to Hawaii. Ascend details Claire finally taking leave of LA – and the before and after of this decision. My …

Illegal Civilization – Summer of ’17

  “For many young people, summer in the suburbs is its own little universe. During this precious chunk of time off from school, adults are often out of sight, even further out of mind, and friends become the most important people on the planet. As you skate, swim, or chill through the days, there’s the opportunity of getting to know your pals — and yourself — better than ever. That’s the journey Summer ’17, a new short film by Illegal Civilization and The FADER, captures. Shot on location in North Hollywood and Burbank, California, Summer ’17 follows Jeffery, played by Ryder McLaughlin, as he tries to win over a summer crush. Produced by Malcolm Washington, directed by Illegal Civ’s Mikey Alfred, and shot by Ayinde Anderson, the film had a lot of young, black creatives who worked behind the lens to bring this film to life. Featuring cameos from Civ friends like Tyler, the Creator, and Aminé, every scene takes place across the IRL teen hangouts of Alfred’s youth. It’s the skate brand and film …

WATCH: Come Swim

  Kristen Stewarts directorial debut is exquisitely unnerving. Inviting viewers on an artistic, highly imagined and confronting journey through a mans imagination, it strives to depict anxiety, depression and heartbreak – through water. “I was fixated on  one image for a long time,” Stewart says. “The idea of a man sleeping on the bottom of the ocean, and just being able to do that – really content and isolated and completely away from everything. Which, you know, is actually awful. But it seems really appealing for a minute.” “I kind of expanded on that, and figured that I might be able to externalise a really internal feeling, depicting it solely from a personal perspective.” That’s what Come Swim feels like. Like an internal storm of numb emotions pushed into the real world in raw and shocking ways.    

WATCH: Slapper

  Gritty, sexual, and seeped in a raw social realism, Slapper is a gut-punch of a film. Released online a few weeks ago after a slew of festival appearances (including Sundance, Melbourne International, Sydney, and various International appearances), it’s left audiences thrilled, disgusted, and shocked. Director Luci Schroder commited over 4 years of her life to the project, even living in the rural Australian suburban area Slapper was shot. The casting process was long, and she ended up taking to the streets. “A few people were even found in a KFC and in the Morewell mall.” Whilst some people find the film intensely over-the-top, Schroder says it isn’t a patch on the real things that are going on in parts of rural Australia. “I want to tell stories that speak to the hardship of human life,” she says, explaining what drew her to the project. “I enjoy working with people whose stories and messages are vital and important for survival.” An undercurrent of black humour, viscerally charged cinematography and a stunning performance from Saphire Blossom give Slapper a powerful, raw …

WATCH: Unglued Vacation

  Unglued Vacation is the brainchild of Olivia Williams, 17 year old surf videographer and founder of Rare Visuals. We asked her about the story behind the film: “Well, firstly, my mom questioned whether “Unglued” was even a word, and I honestly have no idea, but it suited the movie. A bunch of us traveled to Christchurch, and we had a few days to free surf and meet up with legends like Cam Haylock, Minnie Robberds and Ambrose Mcneil. I was always planning to make a movie from the footage I took, but I ended up having too much of a blast over there, and really didn’t get out and shoot much at all. Luckily, Kieran Harris from OuterPathFilms called me up and sent through some footage he wasn’t using, The editing was on and off over a long period of time … I didn’t really know what outcome I was going for, but I guess it worked!” The Official Selection of the 2017 Noosa Surf Film Festival, Unglued Vacation is exactly what it sounds like – …

WATCH: No Love For Fuckboys

  No Love For Fuckboys explores the layers of sexual assault, and the repercussions afterwards. Director Ricardo Bouyett created the film as a form of response and recovery from his own sexual assault experience. “The project became about discussing a sexual assault survivor’s perspective on love and dating. Sexual assault survivor stories are often diluted to just the drama of the rape and the initial shock; I wanted to make a story that’s about the survivor’s point of view after. How does one’s perspective of life shift when trauma strikes? Does it even shift or does it get heightened?” In his Director Notes, Bouyett explains his complete belief as a child that he would never find love, and how his rape cemented his belief that he wasn’t deserving. He explores the last few years after his sexual assault; looking for love in empty promises, and using the idea of sex as a form of power and control. “I tried fucking my way out of my pain by using other men.” Seperated into seven chapters, and set to spoken …